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Advocates ‘shocked’ to learn Biden considered keeping Trump’s cap on refugees

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SAN DIEGO (Border Report) — Even as the Trump administration kept refugee numbers to record lows, the International Rescue Committee in San Diego was helping settle thousands of refugees from places such as the Democratic Republic of Congo, Afghanistan and Iraq.

There was hope that under President Joe Biden the numbers would go up and more people would be brought to the U.S.

But last week, Biden temporarily dashed those hopes when the White House announced the cap on refugees would remain at 15,000 for the fiscal year 2021, the same total imposed during the Trump era.

According to IRC, more than 700 refugees experienced “distress while President Joe Biden delayed the reversal of harmful policies set by the Trump administration.”

“These are families that have been waiting for a long period of time under the previous administration, refugees that had already been vetted and were completely ready to travel, it really was a devastating blow,” said Donna Duvin, IRC executive director. “Shock is a good way to put it, it was certainly disturbing news.”

The president’s announcement was met with a lot of criticism and disdain on many fronts, and just hours later, the administration pivoted and said it would increase the totals to more than 60,000 starting in May.

International Rescue Committee Executive Director Donna Duvin. (Courtesy: International Rescue Committee)

“We would hope that he will make a bold and courageous commitment in May to increase the numbers at the very least to those who are cued up to be resettled, those who have gone through vetting process,” Duvin said.

According to the agency, there are already over 30,000 people conditionally approved for resettlement by the U.S. government.

“Without change in policy, these families will have to start vetting process all over again,” said Duvin.

Duvin added that the resettlement policies for refugees doesn’t apply to asylum-seekers and migrants in cities such as Tijuana who are awaiting permission to cross into the U.S.

“This doesn’t have an effect on what’s happening south of the border, refugee resettlement is a piece apart,” she said. “The difference is that even though people may be fleeing countries south of the border for persecution or exact same reasons, they are not applying for refugee status in their own countries they are making claims at the border or in the U.S.”

Baja California puts reins on post-COVID ‘freedoms’

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TIJUANA (Border Report) — With COVID-19 cases surging in Mexican cities like Tijuana, Baja California state health officials have decided to slow the return to normalcy in restaurants, hotels, event halls, cafeterias and marketplaces.

Alonso Pérez Rico, Baja’s health secretary, said these type of businesses would have to operate at 50 percent capacity and continue to follow safety measures such as social distancing and face covers.

For event halls — popular venues for weddings and other gatherings — only those with outdoor facilities will be allowed to open.

Outdoor markets will only be permitted to sell food, perishable items and cleaning products.

The restrictions are necessary according to Pérez Rico because all indicators point to another surge of COVID-19 cases.

“Now is the time to put a brake on mobility, time to reduce it to avoid a third wave of contagions, which would devastate the region,” he said

Since the pandemic started more than a year ago, there have been 46,239 cases reported and 7,929 deaths in the border state of Baja California, located directly south of California.

Walter Mondale, Carter’s vice president, dies at 93

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MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Former Vice President Walter F. Mondale, a liberal icon who lost the most lopsided presidential election after bluntly telling voters to expect a tax increase if he won, died Monday. He was 93.

The death of the former senator, ambassador and Minnesota attorney general was announced in a statement from his family. No cause was cited.

Mondale followed the trail blazed by his political mentor, Hubert H. Humphrey, from Minnesota politics to the U.S. Senate and the vice presidency, serving under Jimmy Carter from 1977 to 1981.

His own try for the White House, in 1984, came at the zenith of Ronald Reagan’s popularity. Mondale’s selection of Rep. Geraldine Ferraro of New York as his running mate made him the first major-party presidential nominee to put a woman on the ticket, but his declaration that he would raise taxes helped define the race.

On Election Day, he carried only his home state and the District of Columbia. The electoral vote was 525-13 for Reagan — the biggest landslide in the Electoral College since Franklin Roosevelt defeated Alf Landon in 1936. (Sen. George McGovern got 17 electoral votes in his 1972 defeat, winning Massachusetts and Washington, D.C.)

“I did my best,” Mondale said the day after the election, and blamed no one but himself.

“I think you know I’ve never really warmed up to television,” he said. “In fairness to television, it never really warmed up to me.”

Years later, Mondale said his campaign message had proven to be the right one.

“History has vindicated me that we would have to raise taxes,” he said. “It was very unpopular, but it was undeniably correct.”

In 2002, state and national Democrats looked to Mondale when Sen. Paul Wellstone, D-Minn., was killed in a plane crash less than two weeks before Election Day. Mondale agreed to stand in for Wellstone, and early polls showed him with a lead over the Republican candidate, Norm Coleman.

But the 53-year-old Coleman, emphasizing his youth and vigor, out-hustled the then-74-year-old Mondale in an intense six-day campaign. Mondale was also hurt by a partisan memorial service for Wellstone, in which thousands of Democrats booed Republican politicians in attendance. One speaker pleaded: “We are begging you to help us win this election for Paul Wellstone.”

Polls showed the service put off independents and cost Mondale votes. Coleman won by 3 percentage points.

“The eulogizers were the ones hurt the most,” Mondale said after the election. “It doesn’t justify it, but we all make mistakes. Can’t we now find it in our hearts to forgive them and go on?”

It was a particularly bitter defeat for Mondale, who even after his loss to Reagan had taken solace in his perfect record in Minnesota.

“One of the things I’m most proud of,” he said in 1987, “is that not once in my public career did I ever lose an election in Minnesota.”

Years after the 2002 defeat, Mondale returned to the Senate to stand beside Democrat Al Franken in 2009 when he was sworn in to replace Coleman after a drawn-out recount and court battle.

Mondale started his career in Washington in 1964, when he was appointed to the Senate to replace Humphrey, who had resigned to become vice president. Mondale was elected to a full six-year term with about 54% of the vote in 1966, although Democrats lost the governorship and suffered other election setbacks. In 1972, Mondale won another Senate term with nearly 57% of the vote.

His Senate career was marked by advocacy of social issues such as education, housing, migrant workers and child nutrition. Like Humphrey, he was an outspoken supporter of civil rights.

Mondale tested the waters for a presidential bid in 1974 but ultimately decided against it. “Basically I found I did not have the overwhelming desire to be president, which is essential for the kind of campaign that is required,” he said in November 1974.

In 1976, Carter chose Mondale as No. 2 on his ticket and went on to unseat Gerald Ford.

As vice president, Mondale had a close relationship with Carter. He was the first vice president to occupy an office in the White House, rather than in a building across the street. Mondale traveled extensively on Carter’s behalf, and advised him on domestic and foreign affairs.

While he lacked Humphrey’s charisma, Mondale had a droll sense of humor.

When he dropped out of the 1976 presidential sweepstakes, he said, “I don’t want to spend the next two years in Holiday Inns.”

Reminded of that shortly before he was picked as Carter’s running mate, Mondale said, “I’ve checked and found that they’re all redecorated, and they’re marvelous places to stay.”

Mondale never backed away from his liberal principles.

“I think that the country more than ever needs progressive values,” Mondale said in 1989.

That year, Democrats tried to persuade him to challenge Minnesota GOP Sen. Rudy Boschwitz, but he decided against making the race, saying it was time to make way for a new generation.

“One of the requirements of a healthy party is that it renews itself,” he said at the time. “You can’t keep running Walter Mondale for everything.”

That paved the way for Wellstone to win the Democratic nomination, and go on to upset Boschwitz. Wellstone had been preparing to take on Mondale in a primary but would have been a heavy underdog.

The son of a Methodist minister and a music teacher, Walter Frederick Mondale was born Jan. 5, 1928, in tiny Ceylon, Minnesota, and grew up in several small southern Minnesota towns.

He was only 20 when he served as a congressional district manager for Humphrey’s successful Senate campaign in 1948. His education, interrupted by a two-year stint in the Army, culminated with a law degree from the University of Minnesota in 1956.

Mondale began a law practice in Minneapolis and ran the successful 1958 gubernatorial campaign of Democrat Orville Freeman, who appointed Mondale state attorney general in 1960. Mondale was elected attorney general in the fall of 1960 and was reelected in 1962.

As attorney general, Mondale moved quickly into civil rights, antitrust and consumer protection cases. He was the first Minnesota attorney general to make consumer protection a campaign issue.

After his White House years, Mondale served from 1993-96 as President Bill Clinton’s ambassador to Japan, fighting for U.S. access to markets ranging from cars to cellular phones.

He helped avert a trade war in June 1995 over autos and auto parts, persuading Japanese officials to give American automakers more access to Japanese dealers and pushing Japanese carmakers to buy U.S. parts.

Mondale kept his ties to the Clintons. In 2008, he endorsed Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton for president, switching his allegiance only after Barack Obama sealed the nomination.

When Democrats came to him after Wellstone’s death, Mondale was working at the Minneapolis law firm of Dorsey & Whitney and serving on corporate and nonprofit boards. He returned to the firm after the brief campaign.

Mondale and his wife, Joan Adams Mondale, were married in 1955. During his vice presidency, she pushed for more government support of the arts and gained the nickname “Joan of Art.” She had minored in art in college and worked at museums in Boston and Minneapolis.

The couple had two sons, Ted and William, and a daughter, Eleanor. Eleanor Mondale became a broadcast journalist and TV host, with credits including “CBS This Morning” and programs with E! Entertainment Television. Ted Mondale served six years in the Minnesota Senate and made an unsuccessful bid for the Democratic nomination for governor in 1998. William Mondale served for a time as an assistant attorney general.

Joan Mondale died in 2014 at age 83 after an extended illness.

___

Former Associated Press writer Brian Bakst contributed to this report.

New COVID-19 antibody treatment facility opens in South Bay

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CHULA VISTA, Calif. – The second county operated antibody treatment facility is up and running in South County, offering free emergency use of combination monoclonal antibodies to anyone experiencing symptoms of COVID-19. 

Standing with a group of medical professionals outside the former Chula Vista Fire Station No. 5 where the facility is housed, county Supervisor Nora Vargas said “it’s no accident” the area was chosen given how hard it’s been hit by COVID-19.

The no-cost clinic is open seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

“It has had the highest number of coronavirus cases as well as a large number of essential workers who live here, too,” Vargas said.

Although the county has seen a decline in the overall number of positive cases, new cases still are being reported each day. County public health officials on Monday reported 152 new COVID-19 infections and no new deaths, bringing cumulative pandemic totals to 275,112 cases while the death toll remains at 3,674.

Of the 6,982 test results reported Monday, 2% returned positive. The 14-day rolling average of positive tests is 1.8%.

For the second day in a row, hospitalizations related to coronavirus remained at 177. There were 56 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit beds as of Monday, a decrease of one from the previous day. There were 48 staffed, available ICU beds in the county.

The key to the success of monoclonal therapy is to get treatment within the first 10 days of showing symptoms. It works by attaching itself to the spike protein on the virus, health experts say.

“The monoclonal antibodies target those spike proteins to try and prevent them from attaching and entering our cells,” said Dr. Maria Carriedo of San Ysidro Health. “In people with mild or moderate symptoms, we can start the treatment early and it will prevent them from progressing to a more serious illness or even hospitalization.”

The latest combination treatment found a decrease in hospitalizations and death by 70%.

More information on the clinic is available by calling 619-685-2500.

Walter Mondale, Carter’s vice president, dies at 93

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MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Former Vice President Walter F. Mondale, a liberal icon who lost the most lopsided presidential election after bluntly telling voters to expect a tax increase if he won, died Monday. He was 93.

The death of the former senator, ambassador and Minnesota attorney general was announced in a statement from his family. No cause was cited.

Mondale followed the trail blazed by his political mentor, Hubert H. Humphrey, from Minnesota politics to the U.S. Senate and the vice presidency, serving under Jimmy Carter from 1977 to 1981.

  • FILE – In this Monday, July 26, 2004, file photo, former Vice President Walter Mondale smiles with his wife, Joan, in the Minnesota delegation during the Democratic National Convention at the FleetCenter in Boston. Mondale, a liberal icon who lost the most lopsided presidential election after bluntly telling voters to expect a tax increase if he won, died Monday, April 19, 2021. He was 93. (AP Photo/Amy Sancetta, File)
  • FILE – In an Oct. 30, 2012, file photo, former Vice President Walter Mondale, a former Minnesota senator, gestures while speaking at a Students for Obama rally at the University of Minnesota’s McNamara Alumni Center in Minneapolis. Mondale, a liberal icon who lost the most lopsided presidential election after bluntly telling voters to expect a tax increase if he won, died Monday, April 19, 2021. He was 93. (AP Photo/Jim Mone, File)
  • Former US Vice-President under Jimmy Carter, Walter “Fritz” Mondale, attends a luncheon in honor of Prime Minister of Japan Shinzo Abe held by US Secretary of State John Kerry and US Vice-President Joe Biden April 28, 2015 at the US Department of State in Washington, DC. AFP PHOTO/PAUL J. RICHARDS (Photo credit should read PAUL J. RICHARDS/AFP via Getty Images)

His own try for the White House, in 1984, came at the zenith of Ronald Reagan’s popularity. Mondale’s selection of Rep. Geraldine Ferraro of New York as his running mate made him the first major-party presidential nominee to put a woman on the ticket, but his declaration that he would raise taxes helped define the race.

On Election Day, he carried only his home state and the District of Columbia. The electoral vote was 525-13 for Reagan — the biggest landslide in the Electoral College since Franklin Roosevelt defeated Alf Landon in 1936. (Sen. George McGovern got 17 electoral votes in his 1972 defeat, winning Massachusetts and Washington, D.C.)

“I did my best,” Mondale said the day after the election, and blamed no one but himself.

“I think you know I’ve never really warmed up to television,” he said. “In fairness to television, it never really warmed up to me.”

Years later, Mondale said his campaign message had proven to be the right one.

“History has vindicated me that we would have to raise taxes,” he said. “It was very unpopular, but it was undeniably correct.”

In 2002, state and national Democrats looked to Mondale when Sen. Paul Wellstone, D-Minn., was killed in a plane crash less than two weeks before Election Day. Mondale agreed to stand in for Wellstone, and early polls showed him with a lead over the Republican candidate, Norm Coleman.

But the 53-year-old Coleman, emphasizing his youth and vigor, out-hustled the then-74-year-old Mondale in an intense six-day campaign. Mondale was also hurt by a partisan memorial service for Wellstone, in which thousands of Democrats booed Republican politicians in attendance. One speaker pleaded: “We are begging you to help us win this election for Paul Wellstone.”

Polls showed the service put off independents and cost Mondale votes. Coleman won by 3 percentage points.

“The eulogizers were the ones hurt the most,” Mondale said after the election. “It doesn’t justify it, but we all make mistakes. Can’t we now find it in our hearts to forgive them and go on?”

It was a particularly bitter defeat for Mondale, who even after his loss to Reagan had taken solace in his perfect record in Minnesota.

“One of the things I’m most proud of,” he said in 1987, “is that not once in my public career did I ever lose an election in Minnesota.”

Years after the 2002 defeat, Mondale returned to the Senate to stand beside Democrat Al Franken in 2009 when he was sworn in to replace Coleman after a drawn-out recount and court battle.

Mondale started his career in Washington in 1964, when he was appointed to the Senate to replace Humphrey, who had resigned to become vice president. Mondale was elected to a full six-year term with about 54% of the vote in 1966, although Democrats lost the governorship and suffered other election setbacks. In 1972, Mondale won another Senate term with nearly 57% of the vote.

His Senate career was marked by advocacy of social issues such as education, housing, migrant workers and child nutrition. Like Humphrey, he was an outspoken supporter of civil rights.

Mondale tested the waters for a presidential bid in 1974 but ultimately decided against it. “Basically I found I did not have the overwhelming desire to be president, which is essential for the kind of campaign that is required,” he said in November 1974.

In 1976, Carter chose Mondale as No. 2 on his ticket and went on to unseat Gerald Ford.

As vice president, Mondale had a close relationship with Carter. He was the first vice president to occupy an office in the White House, rather than in a building across the street. Mondale traveled extensively on Carter’s behalf, and advised him on domestic and foreign affairs.

While he lacked Humphrey’s charisma, Mondale had a droll sense of humor.

When he dropped out of the 1976 presidential sweepstakes, he said, “I don’t want to spend the next two years in Holiday Inns.”

Reminded of that shortly before he was picked as Carter’s running mate, Mondale said, “I’ve checked and found that they’re all redecorated, and they’re marvelous places to stay.”

Mondale never backed away from his liberal principles.

“I think that the country more than ever needs progressive values,” Mondale said in 1989.

That year, Democrats tried to persuade him to challenge Minnesota GOP Sen. Rudy Boschwitz, but he decided against making the race, saying it was time to make way for a new generation.

“One of the requirements of a healthy party is that it renews itself,” he said at the time. “You can’t keep running Walter Mondale for everything.”

That paved the way for Wellstone to win the Democratic nomination, and go on to upset Boschwitz. Wellstone had been preparing to take on Mondale in a primary but would have been a heavy underdog.

The son of a Methodist minister and a music teacher, Walter Frederick Mondale was born Jan. 5, 1928, in tiny Ceylon, Minnesota, and grew up in several small southern Minnesota towns.

He was only 20 when he served as a congressional district manager for Humphrey’s successful Senate campaign in 1948. His education, interrupted by a two-year stint in the Army, culminated with a law degree from the University of Minnesota in 1956.

Mondale began a law practice in Minneapolis and ran the successful 1958 gubernatorial campaign of Democrat Orville Freeman, who appointed Mondale state attorney general in 1960. Mondale was elected attorney general in the fall of 1960 and was reelected in 1962.

As attorney general, Mondale moved quickly into civil rights, antitrust and consumer protection cases. He was the first Minnesota attorney general to make consumer protection a campaign issue.

After his White House years, Mondale served from 1993-96 as President Bill Clinton’s ambassador to Japan, fighting for U.S. access to markets ranging from cars to cellular phones.

He helped avert a trade war in June 1995 over autos and auto parts, persuading Japanese officials to give American automakers more access to Japanese dealers and pushing Japanese carmakers to buy U.S. parts.

Mondale kept his ties to the Clintons. In 2008, he endorsed Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton for president, switching his allegiance only after Barack Obama sealed the nomination.

When Democrats came to him after Wellstone’s death, Mondale was working at the Minneapolis law firm of Dorsey & Whitney and serving on corporate and nonprofit boards. He returned to the firm after the brief campaign.

Mondale and his wife, Joan Adams Mondale, were married in 1955. During his vice presidency, she pushed for more government support of the arts and gained the nickname “Joan of Art.” She had minored in art in college and worked at museums in Boston and Minneapolis.

The couple had two sons, Ted and William, and a daughter, Eleanor. Eleanor Mondale became a broadcast journalist and TV host, with credits including “CBS This Morning” and programs with E! Entertainment Television. Ted Mondale served six years in the Minnesota Senate and made an unsuccessful bid for the Democratic nomination for governor in 1998. William Mondale served for a time as an assistant attorney general.

Joan Mondale died in 2014 at age 83 after an extended illness.

Ashland County man accused of driving to mock crash while intoxicated faces charges

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ASHLAND, Ohio (WJW)– Ashland County Sheriff’s deputies filed several charges against a man who is accused of driving while intoxicated in the same parking lot as a mock crash Friday morning.

Mark Fulk is being held in the Ashland County Jail and is facing several charges including operating a vehicle under the influence, aggravated menacing, resisting arrest and inducing panic.

Fulk is scheduled to appear in Ashland Municipal Court on Tuesday.

Deputies and the Ohio State Highway Patrol were at the Ashland County-West Holmes Career Center holding the mock crash to teach students the dangers of driving while impaired. That’s when they saw a vehicle enter the parking lot at a high rate of speed, the Ashland County Sheriff’s Office said in a news release on Monday

“They believed that this vehicle was part of the demonstration,” the news release said. “A school representative advised the deputies that were on scene for the demonstration of this possible impaired driver.”

The deputies quickly went to Fulk’s car. When they started speaking to him, they detected an odor of alcohol.

“While talking to Mr. Fulk, deputies noticed his slurred speech as he spoke incoherently acting in an erratic manner,” the release said. “Deputies reported that Mr. Fulk made statements and gestures toward students in a violent manner.”

Fulk said he was at the school to take the cat he had in the vehicle to the vet, according to deputies.

The news release said Fulk failed a field sobriety tests and had an open container of alcohol in his car.

One of largest casino projects on Vegas Strip sets opening

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LAS VEGAS (AP) — One of the biggest casino projects ever on the Las Vegas Strip has set a date to open, after more than seven years of planning and building.

Resorts World Las Vegas announced Monday that it will open to the public June 24 and began taking reservations for more than 3,500 rooms at its three Hilton-branded hotels.

The first ground-up resort built on the Strip in more than a decade will open during a pandemic that has upended the Las Vegas economy with business restrictions intended to slow the spread of COVID-19. Nevada Gov. Steve Sisolak has set a June 1 goal for 100% reopening of businesses shuttered in March 2020.

The resort is on the site of the former Stardust, an iconic Las Vegas landmark that was the largest hotel in the world when it opened in 1958 with 1,500 rooms. It closed in 2006 and was owned by Boyd Gaming Corp. when its 32-story tower was imploded in March 2007.

Malaysia-based Genting Group, an operator of resorts and casinos around the world, bought the site in 2013 from Boyd Gaming for $350 million.

The $4.3 billion project has been under construction since May 2015.

Scott Sibella, president of Resorts World Las Vegas, acknowledged the years of work included delays and redesigns to reshape the Asian theme of the big 88-acre (35.6-hectare) property.

“We are filled with gratitude and excitement as we approach our opening … and hope to play a role in Las Vegas’ rebound after what has been an incredibly challenging year,” Sibella said in a statement. A time for doors to open was not immediately disclosed.

The property has emerged as a curved, red 59-story structure with a huge dynamic LED facade facing Las Vegas Boulevard. The owner calls the 100,000-square-foot (9,290-square-meter) display one of the largest in the U.S.

Its three hotels — dubbed Las Vegas Hilton at Resorts World, Conrad Las Vegas at Resorts World, and Crockfords Las Vegas, LXR Hotels and Resorts — are designed to offer a range of amenities.

Announcements in recent weeks have focused on Zouk Nightclub and AYU Dayclub headliners including Zedd and Tiësto, booked with Singapore-based Zouk Group.

The scale of the complex is huge among Strip resorts, with more than 40 restaurants, eateries and beverage outlets; multiple retail shops and stores; a 117,000-square-foot (10,870-square-meter) casino; and 250,000 square feet (23,226 square meters) of meeting and banquet space.

The resort also will include a 5.5-acre (2.2-hectare) pool and spa complex with seven swimming pools.

AEG Presents will partner with the resort in a 5,000-capacity concert and entertainment theater programmed and operated by Concerts West. The Las Vegas Review-Journal has reported possible headliners including Katy Perry, Celine Dion, Carrie Underwood and Luke Bryan.

Resorts World also will have a station connected by developer Elon Musk’s underground Tesla vehicle transit with the renovated Las Vegas Convention Center.

The biggest single development on the Strip was the $9.2 billion CityCenter partnership between MGM Resorts International and Dubai World. It opened in December 2009 on 76 acres (31 hectares) and includes the Aria, Vdara, Waldorf Astoria and Veer hotel and condominium towers and the Crystals retail and entertainment district. Its Harmon tower never opened due to construction defects, and was dismantled.

Other large projects in recent years include the more than $4.1 billion Cosmopolitan of Las Vegas and $2.7 billion Wynn Las Vegas. The Bellagio, known for its dancing water fountains, opened in 1998 at a cost of about $1.6 billion.

Memorial for victims of West Miami-Dade crash vandalized for 2nd time; teen suspect to be tried as adult

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Authorities are investigating after a memorial for the four victims of a New Year’s Day crash in West Miami-Dade was torn down for a second time in less than a month.

The act of vandalism happened as the 16-year-old driver charged in the crash learned he will be tried as an adult.

Cellphone video captured someone using a pink bat to bash photos, candles and mementos at the roadside memorial, located in the area of West Flagler Street and Northwest 79th Avenue.

Investigators said this is the second time the memorial has been defaced since the Jan. 1 crash that claimed the lives of 21-year-old Yulia Barzaga, 22-year-old Christian Mohip, 21-year-old Andres Zacarias and 21-year-old Jenser Salazar.

According to the Florida Highway Patrol, 16-year-old Alex Garcia was the driver responsible.

The teen suspect had a hearing Monday morning in juvenile court.

“I’m being informed by the state that the state has made the decision to file these charges in adult court,” said Miami-Dade Circuit Judge Orlando Prescott. “You’ll be transferred from the Miami-Dade Regional Juvenile Detention Center to the Dade County Jail.”

Garcia is being charged as an adult on nine felony counts.

“It’s going to be one, two, three, four counts of vehicular homicide in reckless manner,” said a prosecutor.

He also faces four counts of manslaughter while driving under the influence and one count of driving under the influence causing serious bodily injury.

FHP officials said Garcia had marijuana and alcohol in his system when his vehicle slammed into the victims’ car at West Flagler Street and 79th Avenue.

All four occupants inside were killed.

Family and friends set up a memorial at the scene of the crash. It was first destroyed in late March, with video of the act posted on social media.

The memorial was rebuilt, but on early Monday morning, another video of its destruction was posted on social media.

The accounts used and the videos have since been deleted.

The victims’ families sent 7News a statement that reads, “We as the family and friends are not being allowed to grieve. This is a constant slap in the face.”

Family members and friends of the victims were expected to repair the memorial Monday evening.

Garcia will make his first appearance in adult court Tuesday morning.

Friday’s varsity football game between East High and Highland postponed due to COVID-19 protocols

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BAKERSFIELD, Calif. (KGET) — The varsity football game between East High and Highland that was scheduled for Friday has been postponed due to COVID-19 safety protocols, according to the Kern High School District.

The junior varsity game is still scheduled to take place at 5 p.m., according to the district.

FFX returns Friday with 17 Sports Director Taylor Schaub. KGET will bring you complete coverage starting at 11:11 p.m. And, don’t miss an expanded edition of FFX on Sunday at 6 p.m.

Former Vice President Walter Mondale dies at 93

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WASHINGTON (NewsNation Now) — Former Vice President Walter Mondale, a liberal icon who lost the most lopsided presidential election after bluntly telling voters to expect a tax increase if he won, has died. He was 93.

Mondale’s family says he died Monday in Minneapolis. No cause was cited.

Mondale served Minnesota as attorney general and U.S. senator. He followed the trail blazed by his political mentor, Hubert H. Humphrey, to the vice presidency, serving under Jimmy Carter from 1977 to 1981.

Mondale and Carter, 96, were the longest living post-presidential pair in U.S. History.

Carter’s office released a statement paying tribute to his former VP and long-time friend:

Today I mourn the passing of my dear friend Walter Mondale, who I consider the best vice president in our country’s history. During our administration, Fritz used his political skill and personal integrity to transform the vice presidency into a dynamic, policy-driving force that had never been seen before and still exists today. He was an invaluable partner and an able servant of the people of Minnesota, the United States, and the world. Fritz Mondale provided us all with a model for public service and private behavior. Rosalynn and I join all Americans in giving thanks for his exemplary life, and we extend our deepest condolences to his family.

former president jimmy carter

Mondale’s own try for the White House, in 1984, came at the zenith of Ronald Reagan’s popularity. On Election Day, he carried only his home state and the District of Columbia.

Mondale’s selection of Rep. Geraldine Ferraro of New York as his running mate made him the first major-party presidential nominee to put a woman on the ticket, but his declaration that he would raise taxes helped define the race.

On Election Day, he carried only his home state and the District of Columbia. The electoral vote was 525-13 for Reagan — the biggest landslide in the Electoral College since Franklin Roosevelt defeated Alf Landon in 1936. (Sen. George McGovern got 17 electoral votes in his 1972 defeat, winning Massachusetts and Washington, D.C.)

“I did my best,” Mondale said the day after the election, and blamed no one but himself.

“I think you know I’ve never really warmed up to television,” he said. “In fairness to television, it never really warmed up to me.”

Years later, Mondale said his campaign message had proven to be the right one.

“History has vindicated me that we would have to raise taxes,” he said. “It was very unpopular, but it was undeniably correct.”

Washington, UNITED STATES: Former US vice president Walter Mondale makes remarks during the unveiling ceremony of the statue Norway’s late Crown Princess Martha 18 September 2005 at the Norwegian embassy in Washington. Mondale, himself of Norwegian descent, serves as chairman of the Centennial Gift committee of the Norwegian American Foundation, which gave the statue as a gift in honor of the country’s centennial. King Harald V and his sisters, Princess Astrid and Princess Ragnhild, took refuge with their mother, Princess Martha, for five years during World War II in Washington and spent some months at the White House as guests of President Franklin D. Roosevelt. AFP PHOTO/Chip SOMODEVILLA (Photo credit should read CHIP SOMODEVILLA/AFP via Getty Images)

In 2002, state and national Democrats looked to Mondale when Sen. Paul Wellstone, D-Minn., was killed in a plane crash less than two weeks before Election Day. Mondale agreed to stand in for Wellstone, and early polls showed him with a lead over the Republican candidate, Norm Coleman.

But the 53-year-old Coleman, emphasizing his youth and vigor, out-hustled the then-74-year-old Mondale in an intense six-day campaign. Mondale was also hurt by a partisan memorial service for Wellstone, in which thousands of Democrats booed Republican politicians in attendance. One speaker pleaded: “We are begging you to help us win this election for Paul Wellstone.”

Polls showed the service put off independents and cost Mondale votes. Coleman won by 3 percentage points.

“The eulogizers were the ones hurt the most,” Mondale said after the election. “It doesn’t justify it, but we all make mistakes. Can’t we now find it in our hearts to forgive them and go on?”

It was a particularly bitter defeat for Mondale, who even after his loss to Reagan had taken solace in his perfect record in Minnesota.

“One of the things I’m most proud of,” he said in 1987, “is that not once in my public career did I ever lose an election in Minnesota.”

Years after the 2002 defeat, Mondale returned to the Senate to stand beside Democrat Al Franken in 2009 when he was sworn in to replace Coleman after a drawn-out recount and court battle.

WASHINGTON, DC – SEPTEMBER 24: Former U.S. Vice President Walter Mondale speaks at a Georgetown University Law Center discussion September 24, 2013 in Washington, DC. Hart joined former Sen. Gary Hart (D-CO) and Sen. Patrick Leahy in discussing “Surveillance and Foreign Intelligence Gathering in the United States: Past, Present, and Future.” (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)

Mondale started his career in Washington in 1964, when he was appointed to the Senate to replace Humphrey, who had resigned to become vice president. Mondale was elected to a full six-year term with about 54% of the vote in 1966, although Democrats lost the governorship and suffered other election setbacks. In 1972, Mondale won another Senate term with nearly 57% of the vote.

His Senate career was marked by advocacy of social issues such as education, housing, migrant workers and child nutrition. Like Humphrey, he was an outspoken supporter of civil rights.

Mondale tested the waters for a presidential bid in 1974 but ultimately decided against it. “Basically I found I did not have the overwhelming desire to be president, which is essential for the kind of campaign that is required,” he said in November 1974.

In 1976, Carter chose Mondale as No. 2 on his ticket and went on to unseat Gerald Ford.

As vice president, Mondale had a close relationship with Carter. He was the first vice president to occupy an office in the White House, rather than in a building across the street. Mondale traveled extensively on Carter’s behalf, and advised him on domestic and foreign affairs.

While he lacked Humphrey’s charisma, Mondale had a droll sense of humor.

When he dropped out of the 1976 presidential sweepstakes, he said, “I don’t want to spend the next two years in Holiday Inns.”

Reminded of that shortly before he was picked as Carter’s running mate, Mondale said, “I’ve checked and found that they’re all redecorated, and they’re marvelous places to stay.”

Mondale never backed away from his liberal principles.

“I think that the country more than ever needs progressive values,” Mondale said in 1989.

That year, Democrats tried to persuade him to challenge Minnesota GOP Sen. Rudy Boschwitz, but he decided against making the race, saying it was time to make way for a new generation.

“One of the requirements of a healthy party is that it renews itself,” he said at the time. “You can’t keep running Walter Mondale for everything.”

WASHINGTON, DC – APRIL 28: Walter Mondale, former Vice President of the United States arrives for the state dinner in honor of Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and wife Akie Abe April 28, 2015 at the Booksellers area of the White House in Washington, DC. The Japanese Prime Minister and his wife are on an official visit to Washington. (Photo by Olivier Douliery/Getty Images)

That paved the way for Wellstone to win the Democratic nomination, and go on to upset Boschwitz. Wellstone had been preparing to take on Mondale in a primary but would have been a heavy underdog.

The son of a Methodist minister and a music teacher, Walter Frederick Mondale was born Jan. 5, 1928, in tiny Ceylon, Minnesota, and grew up in several small southern Minnesota towns.

He was only 20 when he served as a congressional district manager for Humphrey’s successful Senate campaign in 1948. His education, interrupted by a two-year stint in the Army, culminated with a law degree from the University of Minnesota in 1956.

Mondale began a law practice in Minneapolis and ran the successful 1958 gubernatorial campaign of Democrat Orville Freeman, who appointed Mondale state attorney general in 1960. Mondale was elected attorney general in the fall of 1960 and was reelected in 1962.

As attorney general, Mondale moved quickly into civil rights, antitrust and consumer protection cases. He was the first Minnesota attorney general to make consumer protection a campaign issue.

After his White House years, Mondale served from 1993-96 as President Bill Clinton’s ambassador to Japan, fighting for U.S. access to markets ranging from cars to cellular phones.

He helped avert a trade war in June 1995 over autos and auto parts, persuading Japanese officials to give American automakers more access to Japanese dealers and pushing Japanese carmakers to buy U.S. parts.

Mondale kept his ties to the Clintons. In 2008, he endorsed Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton for president, switching his allegiance only after Barack Obama sealed the nomination.

WASHINGTON, DC – OCTOBER 20: US Vice President Joe Biden (R) speaks about former Vice President Walter Mondale during an event to honor the former VP at George Washington University October 20, 2015 in Washington, DC. Biden remains at the center of rumors regarding a potential campaign for the U.S. presidency. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

When Democrats came to him after Wellstone’s death, Mondale was working at the Minneapolis law firm of Dorsey & Whitney and serving on corporate and nonprofit boards. He returned to the firm after the brief campaign.

Mondale and his wife, Joan Adams Mondale, were married in 1955. During his vice presidency, she pushed for more government support of the arts and gained the nickname “Joan of Art.” She had minored in art in college and worked at museums in Boston and Minneapolis.

The couple had two sons, Ted and William, and a daughter, Eleanor. Eleanor Mondale became a broadcast journalist and TV host, with credits including “CBS This Morning” and programs with E! Entertainment Television. Ted Mondale served six years in the Minnesota Senate and made an unsuccessful bid for the Democratic nomination for governor in 1998. William Mondale served for a time as an assistant attorney general.

Joan Mondale died in 2014 at age 83 after an extended illness.

Former Associated Press writer Brian Bakst contributed to this report.

This story is developing. Check back soon for updates